sci-universe

sci-universe:

The Fukang meteorite, believed to be some 4.5 billion years old, was found near a town of the same name in China, in 2000. It is a pallasite, a type of meteorite with golden crystals of a mineral called olivine embedded in a silvery honeycomb of nickel-iron.

The original meteorite weighted just over a thousand kilogram (~2k pounds), but the rock was so brilliant that everybody wanted a piece of it. Since then it has been divided into dozens of thin slices and auctioned or distributed around the world. Fukang is possibly the most stunning extraterrestrial piece of rock man has ever seen.

Photo sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

spacettf
spacettf:

Arrival and Departure at Phoebe by Lunar and Planetary Institute on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: As it entered the Saturn system, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft performed its first targeted flyby of one of the planet’s moons. On June 11, 2004, Cassini passed Phoebe, the largest of Saturn’s outer or “irregular” moons, at an altitude of just 1,285 miles (2,068 kilometers). This was the sole close flyby of one of the outer moons of Saturn in the entire Cassini mission. This montage of two views is published by the Cassini team to mark the 10th anniversary of the Phoebe flyby. The image on the left side shows Cassini’s view on approach to Phoebe, while the right side shows the spacecraft’s departing perspective. The image mosaic on the left, recorded about 45 minutes before closest approach to Phoebe, is composed of six frames from Cassini’s Narrow-Angle Camera (NAC), plus one Wide-Angle Camera (WAC) image to fill the gap on the upper-right limb. The image has a spatial resolution of 260 feet (80 meters) per pixel. The sun-Phoebe-spacecraft, or phase, angle is 80 degrees. The image at right, taken about half an hour after closest approach, is composed of eight NAC frames. The spatial resolution is 210 feet (65 meters) per pixel, and the phase angle is 83 degrees.

spacettf:

Arrival and Departure at Phoebe by Lunar and Planetary Institute on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
As it entered the Saturn system, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft performed its first targeted flyby of one of the planet’s moons. On June 11, 2004, Cassini passed Phoebe, the largest of Saturn’s outer or “irregular” moons, at an altitude of just 1,285 miles (2,068 kilometers). This was the sole close flyby of one of the outer moons of Saturn in the entire Cassini mission. This montage of two views is published by the Cassini team to mark the 10th anniversary of the Phoebe flyby.

The image on the left side shows Cassini’s view on approach to Phoebe, while the right side shows the spacecraft’s departing perspective. The image mosaic on the left, recorded about 45 minutes before closest approach to Phoebe, is composed of six frames from Cassini’s Narrow-Angle Camera (NAC), plus one Wide-Angle Camera (WAC) image to fill the gap on the upper-right limb. The image has a spatial resolution of 260 feet (80 meters) per pixel. The sun-Phoebe-spacecraft, or phase, angle is 80 degrees. The image at right, taken about half an hour after closest approach, is composed of eight NAC frames. The spatial resolution is 210 feet (65 meters) per pixel, and the phase angle is 83 degrees.

spacettf
spacettf:

Heart of the Rho Ophiuchi /Antares regions by ramviswanathan on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: Shot at Henry Coe State Park in Morgan Hill on two consecutive nights.  Night of July 1 - 2 Luminance around 70 mins total Night of July 2-3 RGB data around 60 mins. + old DSLR data from 2011 and 2012 Mount: Kenko Skymemo tracker Camera: QSI 683ws (Luminance), canon T3i (chrominance) Scope: Borg 71FL + 7870.

spacettf:

Heart of the Rho Ophiuchi /Antares regions by ramviswanathan on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Shot at Henry Coe State Park in Morgan Hill on two consecutive nights.
Night of July 1 - 2 Luminance around 70 mins total
Night of July 2-3 RGB data around 60 mins.
+ old DSLR data from 2011 and 2012

Mount: Kenko Skymemo tracker
Camera: QSI 683ws (Luminance), canon T3i (chrominance)
Scope: Borg 71FL + 7870.